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Nov. 21st, 2007 @ 09:38 am go for the freaks! stay for the bluebooking
This supports all my preconceptions, junior-high-level-blog-reading lawyers excepted of course: Why you shouldn't go to law school.

One line from the link: Contemporary lawyering is often an expensive form of childish game-playing with the rules of civil procedure. It's psychological warfare for minute tactical advantage.

I quote that because I learned a new word in email yesterday and that sentiment could have been written for it. Wikipedant, what a perfect blend. Everything you hate about lawyers with none of the intellect!
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From:jl2585
Date:November 22nd, 2007 01:48 am (UTC)
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Paul Gowder's a cool guy. I went to school with him. He's now a Ph.D in political theory at Stanford, after work at a big law firm for several years after graduating from Harvard Law School. Good article too, but I'm enjoying my time here. He's right that law professors have it good.
From:directcodeword
Date:November 22nd, 2007 03:12 am (UTC)

unsurprised

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...it seems to me a universal truth that people love to whine about their work, their co'workers, their competitors, etc... i don't see why the field of law would be exempt from that...i'm not saying this person's personal experiences aren't valid, but a big shortcoming is that this post fails to acknowledge that an affinity for boring tasks is what gravitates many people into the field of law in the first place...it also doesn't mention that most law students don't have any actual experience in the field Before they sign up for lawschool and are a bit shocked that legal work isn't dreamland - this guy sounds like one of them...
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From:uke
Date:November 22nd, 2007 08:06 pm (UTC)
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I thought I made it up, but of course it was too obvious a construction to happen so far to the right of the timeline. There is a user with that name on Wikipedia but the term clearly needs more popularity.
From:matchesmalone
Date:November 30th, 2007 05:44 pm (UTC)

Then, by all means....

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Put an entry in the Urban Dictionary.

http://www.urbandictionary.com/
From:matchesmalone
Date:November 30th, 2007 05:55 pm (UTC)

This is what I get...

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leaping before I look....

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Wikipedant

Is this what we take this word to mean? I gave it a thumbs up....
From:mushi56
Date:November 28th, 2007 11:22 pm (UTC)
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We (myself and some fellow law students) were having a conversation about this earlier this week. People seem to have a very serious misconception about the legal profession. That is, you get in to law school, you get out, and you have some high paying cushy job lined up for you. Obviously, this isn't the case, and it's basically like any other profession, in that you have to work hard to find a decent, enjoyable job. Common sense would suggest that nothing is ever just handed to people on a silver platter.

It's always good advice to have as much information about a career before taking the plunge, however, and the article does a pretty good job about informing people about the profession.

I'll make one quick comment about the article too, I guess. It's somewhat disheartening to think that the legal profession comes down to doing things like having pleadings thrown out for being a day too late, but the nature of the profession is representing someone else. If it's within your knowledge that you could have won a controversy with high stakes on a technicality, is it fair to the person actually involved to let the adversary slide?
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From:extempore
Date:November 29th, 2007 09:33 pm (UTC)
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the nature of the profession is representing someone else. If it's within your knowledge that you could have won a controversy with high stakes on a technicality, is it fair to the person actually involved to let the adversary slide?

A big chunk of the lameness in the legal profession is still part of each individual attorney's job, yes. But even if it is "the system" to blame (and it is), lawyers as a group receive by far the most blame for why we're talking about blame instead of credit. So you're off the hook for individual decisions like ruining lives on technicalities, but not for your share of why it's all such a pile of suck, a share you earn when you pass the bar. I think there's a program where you can work a portion of it off...
From:matchesmalone
Date:November 30th, 2007 05:48 pm (UTC)
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So, then doesn't it make sense to inform people about the steaming pile? And do we as a society need to delve further into why people decide such a career is a good idea? Or is it simply that the media glamorizes this and every other profession? Are some people so sadistic that they enjoy screwing with people with their manipulation of the English Language?

I seriously didn't start off this reply with the intention to have every sentence be in the form of a question, did I? :)