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Sep. 30th, 2005 @ 09:31 am "and furthermore, poo on you"
A slight twist on this syndrome:

Framed man freed after 19 years: Under recent questioning by the FBI, the witness recanted, claiming Eppolito had bribed and intimidated him into identifying Gibbs, authorities said. [...] Given the chance, Gibbs said he would tell Eppolito, "You've got a lot of nerve doing what you did to me."

"You've got a lot of nerve doing what you did to me." I had it wrong before; the quality shared by these wrongly convicted fellows is not highmindedness but a superhuman gift for understatement.
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From:nibor
Date:September 30th, 2005 04:43 pm (UTC)
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I, on the other hand, am wondering what's so magical about "19 years" that's getting people out. Two stories about men wrongly convicted - both freed after 19 years. Coincidence?
You Be The Judge!
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From:extempore
Date:September 30th, 2005 04:52 pm (UTC)
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In the mid-80s crime was getting out of control so maybe cops were of the "fuck it, let's just start jailing whoever we can" mindset.
From:darse
Date:October 3rd, 2005 09:57 pm (UTC)

andy's view

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Andy Dufresne (Shawshank Redemption) was also in prison for 19 years. Spooky, eh?

Is their understatement so surprising? They've had a *long* time to wallow in fruitless outrage. At some point, they have to resign themselves to their unfortunate circumstances. Perhaps it is similar to those who suffer a tragic injury, resulting in paralysis.

Maybe it eventually comes down to this: "Get busy living, or get busy dying".

~d
From:zetack
Date:September 30th, 2005 05:31 pm (UTC)

I can't imagine...

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If I lost 19 years of my life that's everything from when I was 18 years old until today. Everything I've done, experienced, and accomplished my entire adult life gone, wiped out. I can't imagine it.
From:facedownacesup
Date:September 30th, 2005 06:01 pm (UTC)

Re: I can't imagine...

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They are probably guilty of something else, that's why they aren't showing any real righteous indignation. Both these mofos may have been innocent of the crime that convicted them, but that doesn't mean they were they weren't up to other hi-jinks. This guy had a drug problem and the other guy was charged with rape by an ex-girlfriend but was acquitted. I'm pretty sure if we had a time machine we could go back and find something worthy of convicting both of these guys for at least 19 years.



From:ooda_loop
Date:September 30th, 2005 10:13 pm (UTC)
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Everything I've done, experienced, and accomplished my entire adult life gone, wiped out.

But you'd have a whole different set of experiences and accomplishments. Ever seen Midnight Express?

;-)


From:bruteforcex
Date:September 30th, 2005 06:06 pm (UTC)

Imprisonment Effects

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I agree that it's very odd to see time and time again the really subdued responses given by the victims of incorrect imprisonment. But, if we think about it a bit more, maybe what the evidence is telling us is that prisons do change people.

In prison, it's probably not a great idea to let your anger stew and grow uncontrollably. So, living in that sort of environment for any length of time just might change you. Given that you were innocent (and presumably a good person to start), you might be more likely to adapt to the prison environment.

It would be interesting to see responses given by a range of released victims. It might be that there is some sort of bell-shaped curve that would plot time of improper imprisonment and level of anger and hate expressed. If only imprisoned for a month, you might still have the ability to express deep anger, but for one month, nothing too damaging happened (hopefully). But, after a few years, you might not yet have been changed by the system, and can still lash out vehemently. After even more years, the evolution has already taken effect, and you no longer have the ability.

Just a thought.
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From:krizazy
Date:September 30th, 2005 06:29 pm (UTC)

Re: Imprisonment Effects

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Not many have the willpower that Edmond Dantes showed, though I imagine that all would like to.

I imagine that if I were wrongfully imprisoned for an extended period of time my response would be along the lines of: "Yeah the system is fundamentally flawed, everybody knows that, and oh well. It's my fault for having been born into this absurd world. If you don't mind I'd like to go about my business and salvage the rest of the life that you have stolen from me."

~D
From:mathew5000
Date:October 5th, 2005 07:42 am (UTC)

Re: Imprisonment Effects

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It would be interesting to see responses given by a range of released victims.

Then be sure to catch the film After Innocence.
From:sleepycell
Date:September 30th, 2005 06:48 pm (UTC)

this scenario seems more plausible

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wrongly convicted: "You...you SOB...you ruined my life!"

false accusor: "Sorry dude. My bad. I was broke and needed the money."

wc: "oh, alright. i forgive you. that's all in the past now anyway."

fa: "Cool. Let's get a beer."

wc: "Right on. I'm buying."
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From:topher928
Date:October 1st, 2005 01:08 am (UTC)
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From my experience in psychology, I would think that after some time in prison, the anger would give way to acceptance. He knows he's right, he knows it's bullshit, but eventually all human beings adapt to what they are given. If you just spent 19 years of your life in prison, you're not thinking about revenge. You're thinking about the freedom that you missed so badly, and getting the most out of every new day. Sort of like a near-death experience. It just changes your perspective, I think.

That being said, I probably would've spent all that time formulating a better scorcher than "You've got a lot of nerve."
From:epsteininspace
Date:October 1st, 2005 07:39 am (UTC)
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From my experience in psychology, I would think that after some time in prison, the anger would give way to acceptance. He knows he's right, he knows it's bullshit, but eventually all human beings adapt to what they are given.

If you killed or raped someone's kid, then came back 19 years later to tell them, how likely do you think it is that their response would not involve beating you to within an inch of your life? In that scenario, the parents would have certainly adapted to the loss for functional purposes (elsewise they wouldn't still be around 19 years later), but I would estimate that they'd still have plenty of desire for revenge.

That being said, I probably would've spent all that time formulating a better scorcher than "You've got a lot of nerve."

Maybe he was still ripped on Pruno?


In any event, am I the only one who is a bit disturbed that there doesn't seem to be any kind of government program or reimbursement or even a "Hey, Sorry, We Fucked Up" parting check?
From:samholden
Date:October 1st, 2005 02:35 pm (UTC)
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A reimbursement might be a bad thing, as it would make freeing an innocent person a cost. And some bureaucrat somewhere would like to reduce those costs and provide an incentive to not free the person in order to save the cost. Without a reimbursement saving face is the only real reason keep an obvious innocent imprisoned and usually the releaser and the one whose face is being saved are not the same person...

In this case of being setup to go to jail by people who knew you were innocent (rather than it being just a complete mistake) there is probably some sort of civil case you could make against those people.

From:jacksup
Date:October 3rd, 2005 03:34 pm (UTC)
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Isn't "you've got a lot nerve" what the gangsters say before they put a hit on somebody? Pretty sure I saw that in a movie somewhere...
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From:chrishanel
Date:October 6th, 2005 06:39 pm (UTC)
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I like Phil Hellmuth's new taunt better...

PhilHellmuth: coak sucker